Voices on the move – Part 1

By Ina Schebler

Everyone has a story. Everyone has a voice to tell it. And everyone has ears to hear or eyes to read it. Now it only needs people to listen to these voices, to see these faces and to change first their perspective and later the world.

The Idea:

In January 2016, I started collecting stories of people who once fled their homes and who are now living in Germany. They all had their reasons. They all came on different routes and ended in different places. They all had different dreams, expectations and plans for the future when they left their homes.

I departed on this journey because I believed that people who are forced to leave their homes are not ‘just’ refugees, asylum seekers, illegal immigrants or victims of catastrophes. They are humans with individual faces and voices to tell stories.

So, I collected stories of people who have something to share with the world. I created this space made out of words and photos in which voices can talk and in which ears can listen, eyes can see, and minds can understand. Many of those voices tell stories that show that much in this world needs to change. We all have voices and the ability to move not only our bodies away from disasters but also the capacity to move horizons beyond conventions and prejudices. We can connect to voices, connect through voices, and connect our voices. Therefore, voices connect people and maybe one idea in one of these stories will one day be the spark that makes the whole world brighter – who knows?

 

Anna: How could she marry a refugee? “How could she marry a refugee? That her father wasn’t against it!” First, my sister was together with a Sudeten refugee, and then I also married a refugee. People gossiped a lot. They said things like, “How can she marry a refugee? One does not know them! They don’t have anything.” But we didn’t have anything either. Anna, 90 years old, born in Germany

 

 

 

 

 

Anonymous: If I were Ban Ki-moon If I were Ban Ki-moon, I wouldn’t keep repeating:, “I am worried. I am worried.” I would try. I would try to make peace. I would try to make deals. I would try to solve it in a peaceful way. I would try. Syria is not an underdeveloped country. We weren’t poor. I want people to know that. Syrians are educated. We are not stupid. We had everything. It is because of the war that no one can move forward. In Syria, we can no longer move forward. We cannot move forward. In Germany we can. We are not only here to live, we are here to strive and live successfully I need to learn the language because language is so important. I want to get in contact with people. I want to work, first with a German boss or business partner in order to learn from each other what we know; and one day I want to have my own company in the mining industry. Born in Syria

Medienwerkstatt Encounters invites you to our Facebook Watch Party: “Kiezstories”, focusing on the topic “back to the street”, or: “which impact has Corona made in our neighbourhoods?”

2 groups set out on a search – the result are two short films which portray how places in Berlin have changed since the lockdown.

After the screening there will be an opportunity for a Q&A with the filmmakers.


Die Medienwerkstatt Encounters lädt ein zur Facebook Watch Party: „Kiezstories” mit Fokus auf „Back on the street“, oder: „Welche Spuren hat Corona in unserer Nachbarschaft hinterlassen?“

Wann: 30. Oktober 2020 um 19:30 Uhr

2 Gruppen haben sich auf die Suche begeben - entstanden sind 2 Filme, die erzählen, wie sich Orte in Berlin nach dem Lockdown verändert haben!

Nach dem Screening der Kurzfilme gibt es die Möglichkeit, Fragen zu stellen und mit den Filmemacher*innen ins Gespräch zu kommen.

Holler Box